Eurasian Feminism and Communism – From the post-Feudal to the post-Communist

Eurasian Feminism and Communism – From the post-Feudal to the post-Communist

Feminism in post-Feudal China

Becoming Madame Mao, Anchee Min’s pseudo-historical account of Madame Mao Jiang Ching, the b-actress who became the communist lady-empress of China, is not a great foundation for an account of Chinese feminism, or even of a Maoist Feminist.

Madame Mao was an upwardly mobile opportunist, not a feminist. But through her defiant and aggressive clawing to the top of the socioeconomic ladder she exemplifies the struggles of being female-bodied in post-feudal china. In a world of presupposed feminine submissiveness, arranged marriages, and a role to be limited to the domestic sphere, maybe being a vengeful ‘white boned demon’ is what it took for her to get the power usually relegated to men.

Where does feminism stop and civil rights activism begin?

Read more: Eurasian Feminism and Communism – From the post-Feudal to the post-Communist

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